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Darius Jones
alto saxophonist-composer
BIOGRAPHY
Over the past decade, Darius Jones has created a recognizable voice as a critically acclaimed saxophonist and composer by embracing individuality and innovation in the tradition of African-American music. “Jones' concept is proudly his own,” writes Philip Clark in The Wire. [His music] poses big questions about the relationship between the African-American tradition of spirituals, blues and gospel, and now." With New York City as his base since 2005, Jones has brought his unique sound to dozens of cities around the United States, Canada and Europe.

Jones early on established himself as a powerful voice in the jazz community and was nominated in 2013 for Alto Saxophonist of the Year, and for Up & Coming Artist of the Year two years in a row for the Jazz Journalists Association Jazz Awards. Jones was one of Jazz Times' Debut Artists of the Year for 2009 and was featured in the Wall Street Journal in 2011. In 2012 he was featured in DownBeat and on WBGO's The Checkout. Jones' 2012 release, Book of Mæ'bul (Another Kind of Sunrise) was listed among NPR's Best Top 10 Jazz Albums of that year. "Jones speaks through his alto in an original and unforced language," writes DownBeat's Joe Tangari. Critics have called him "robustly creative" (Nate Chinen, New York Times) and "one of NYC's most incisive and passionate saxists" (Time Out New York). AllAboutJazz.com reviewer Troy Collins writes, "Jones has set the stage for a winning series of albums designed to document his rise as one of the most impressive and unique voices of our time."

More recently The New York Times named Jones among the Best Live Jazz Performances of 2017 for his Vision Festival performance with Farmers by Nature.

Jones has collaborated with artists including Gerald Cleaver, Oliver Lake, William Parker, Craig Taborn, Jason Moran, Georgia Ann Muldrow, Trevor Dunn, Eric Revis, Mike Reed, Nasheet Waits, Orrin Evans, Branford Marsalis, Kris Davis, Vijay Iyer, Marshall Allen, Dave Burrell, James Carter, Harriet Tubman, JD Allen, Tyshawn Sorey, Andrew Cyrille, Yo La Tengo, Chad Taylor, Dan Weiss, Matt Mitchell, Ches Smith, Steve Lehman, Jim Black, Sun Ra Arkestra, Shazhad Ismaily, Fay Victor, Cooper-Moore, Imani Uzuri, Matthew Shipp and many more.

Signed to AUM Fidelity records in 2009, Jones has released a string of diverse recordings which comprise his Man’ish Boy Epic, featuring music and images evocative of Black Futurism.

In 2008 Jones was awarded the Van Lier Fellowship by Roulette, which he used to launch his chamber ensemble, the Elizabeth-Caroline Unit, a project dedicated to new works for voice. Roulette continued their support for Darius' work through a Jerome Foundation Commission, and he was a Jerome Artist-in-Residence when the Elizabeth-Caroline Unit premiered the first section of The Oversoul Manual, in the Spring of 2014. Jones made his compositional debut at Carnegie Hall with the same work in October of 2014. In March 2018, Jones presented a new composition entitled LawNOrder a dramatic commentary on social justice and American politics, at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.

In 2013, Jones was awarded the French-American Jazz Exchange grant for a collaboration with French vocalist Emilie Lesbros.

Jones graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University with a Bachelors in Jazz Studies in 2003, earning a Master's Degree in Jazz Performance/Composition from New York University in 2008. He also taught New Music Improvisation there for a year as an adjunct professor. Jones taught saxophone and improvisation at Columbia University in 2017.

Of note, Jones was featured in the Wall Street Journal and BBC's Jazz on 3 in 2011. In 2012 he was featured in the New York City Jazz Record, JazzTimes.com, the Village Voice Blog, DownBeat, and on WBGO's The Checkout. Darius was featured on the cover of Portuguese magazine, Jazz.pt in 2012, and on the cover of Italian magazine, Jazz Colours, in 2013. Darius' 2012 release, Book of Mæ'bul (Another Kind of Sunrise) was listed among NPR's Best Top 10 Jazz Albums of that year.





“…The most visceral and distinctive alto saxophonist of this era.” –THE NEW YORK TIMES, Giovanni Russonello


"4-Stars. Today, he demonstrates that his musical persona will not be easily pigeonholed."
-DOWNBEAT, Alain Drouot

"...with expressive glissandi as opulently sensual as that of Johnny Hodges, and a knack for flipping innocent melodic utterances into lines fraught with chancy harmonic and rhythmic ambiguities, Jones's concept is proudly his own. This record poses big questions about the relationship between the African-American tradition of spirituals, blues and gospel, and now."-THE WIRE, Philip Clark

"4-Stars: Jones' playing and composing may have some of the mercurial energy associated with the avant-garde but the communicative immediacy of African-American folk traditions stands like a bedrock in his work. Like all players that matter, Jones brings a lived-in, wizened quality to his performances, as if he knows something not just of black diasporan musical traditions but of the lives behind them."
– JAZZWISE, Kevin LeGendre

"Darius Jones has the capacity for a proud, rafters-raising tone on alto saxophone, and as an improviser he's fearless but disciplined. Man'ish Boy (A Raw & Beautiful Thing) is a robustly accomplished debut that confirms not only the blunt fact of his arrival but also the ceaseless vitality of his chosen tradition. Akeen awareness of that tradition underpins the album, for reasons of spirit and style. Mr. Jones, who is in his early 30s, wisely teamed up with a pair of sympathetic mentors .. Their interaction is open-hearted and intense .. it adds up to a powerfully soulful blend."
-THE NEW YORK TIMES, Nate Chinen

"One of the most ambitious albums [The Oversoul Manual] made in the past decade and certainly the most aspirational in alto saxophonist Darius Jones’ already-impressive catalogue of recordings. And more impressive still, Jones doesn’t play a note on the release yet his musicality—a mix of concept, aesthetic, personality and investigation—is as evident as if it were a solo session. The four vocalists featured as The Elizabeth-Caroline Unit are both instruments and living interpreters of Jones’ complex, simultaneously futuristic and primal work." –THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD, Andrey Henkin


“An alto saxophone player whose sound drips with passion...Jones has a talent for penning intensely emotional themes, which provide a fertile launching pad for his vibrato-laden alto preaching...the valedictory, elegiac "Forgive Me" sounds like a newly found spiritual, with some of most beautiful sounds ever committed to disc.” – ALL ABOUT JAZZ, John Sharpe